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Slow Flowers resource

Foxglove is dedicated to supporting local flower farmers, and using only chemical-free flowers and flora. Thank you for being an integral part of this important sustainability chain. With every purchase, your dollars funnel back into our community, and keep this ball rollin'.

But...if you are ever need to order or send flowers in any other great U.S. city, please check out this amazing resource. Slowflowers.com is a national directory of florists and retailers who use American Grown flowers. Many of them source locally, just like Foxglove! It is a great alternative to the usual online floral companies, and means you'll be making the best choice you can every time you send flowers!

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Michael + Lindsey

August | Local flowers & flora
all photos by Guytano Magno photography

Hydrangea | Lisianthus | Bush Clover | Mugwort | Artemisia | Nodding Sedge Grass | Queen Anne's Lace |Yellow Gentian

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PDubs Rule.

"It was a bright, defrosted, pussy-willow day at the onset of spring and the newlyweds were driving cross-country in a large roast turkey." Skinny Legs and All  Tom Robbins
Print by Lisa Rydin Erickson

Print by Lisa Rydin Erickson

Catkins. PDubs. Pussy Willow. Squishy Balls. Calix discolor. Bunny Tails.

A first sign of spring in the Midwest, whatever you choose to call them.
(okay, I only know one 4 year old who calls them squishy balls)

It's PDub season, y'all.
 

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Foxglove 2016!

As many of you know by now, I closed the Foxglove storefront at the end of 2015. This decision, as most are, was not cut and dried nor easily made. But, as soon as I decided to make this transition, all of the elements started to align to make it happen. I took that as a strong sign I was making the right decision, and that feeling continues as I make new plans and work into the next phase of Foxglove. When I opened the brick and mortar shop, I decided to try my hand at retailing locally-grown, chemical-free flowers. With no real clue as to how to do that or if it were even possible in our Minnesota climate, I jumped in and gave it a whirl. And-it worked. My goal was to make this a viable option for consumers here, and expand the definition of “flower shop”. Along the way my passion for the flower studio grew and so did the demand. I began to design weddings and events, create more educational materials and speak about the slow flowers movement, and increase the day to day flower sales.

So the time came when having a retail shop, flower studio, and workshop schedule-all run by me!-became too much. It was my desire to focus my time and energy on becoming a stronger local advocate for slow flowers. This means I have spent the late winter season researching and planning for the steps I will take this year to put this new mission into action. First of all, I am thrilled to have more time to devote to the flower studio-booking more weddings and events, delivering arrangements, and selling flowers at pop-ups and select locations. Secondly, my schedule is more open for getting out and about to spread the word about local flowers, advocate and educate, as well as collaborate with lots of super folks. It's going to be awesome.

xo Christine

 

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Harvested here.

"Intentionally-sourced arrangements from small farms and gardens in the Midwest"

After a few months of creating, writing, and refining, I am delighted to have my new Flowers & Flora booklet in hand. This creation is my mission in a nutshell (a very carefully crafted nutshell). Since opening Foxglove, my work with local flowers & flora has proved to be incredibly rewarding and exciting for me. My own ideas about what this endeavor means have evolved, and I find that I love sharing my knowledge and extending the education base for what local flowers & flora are and why they matter.

2015 has already been, and will continue to be, an important year of growth for this part of my business. This lovely little booklet outlines the three main components of my mission and values, as well as what the Foxglove flower studio offers for you.


IMPACT
Embrace Healthy Homes
The average grocery store bouquet travels around 2,000 miles and encounters up to 127 different chemicals before it reaches your table. This is why Foxglove is dedicated to working with local farmers who grow flowers using sustainable and organic practices. These methods use fewer resources, zero chemicals, and support a diverse ecological system, benefiting our local pollinators, birds, and wildlife. Fresh cut blooms are harvested here and delivered directly to Foxglove by the farmers who grew them.

AESTHETIC
Celebrate Seasonal Style
Seasonal style is central to my design aesthetic. The spaces I create have a sense of ease about them, using a loose, natural style and an appreciation for the imperfect. In-season flowers & flora ~ a simple flowering branch in early spring; a lush bouquet at peak garden season; cedar springs in the winter~ reflect this and let us embrace the season. By using these elements, we create a continuum with the outdoors, fostering  a deeper engagement and understanding of the natural world.

INTENTION
Support Local Growers
Whether it be a ripe tomato in December or a red rose in February, we have come to expect anything we desire. This creates an unnatural sense of abundance, with little consideration for resources. Learning to appreciate what is in season frees us to live with intention and mindfulness. As our buying habits adjust, we support local farmers, makers, and businesses, and our whole community benefits. Bit by bit, we can nurture change. It's time to demand a better bouquet.

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Nurture

It's winter again.

The quiet of January always comes as a relief-and a shock.

We slow down after months of frantic preparation and participation.

I try to appreciate the calmer days, and am about to take that to another level-closing the shop for a dedicated time of slowing down. Nurture is the word that keeps coming to mind. Nurturing myself with a trip. Getting away. That's a big way to nurture, isn't it? Taking time to travel and see new things. Or see nothing but the view into the ocean. or the woods. or your yard. Taking that time to nurture yourself. 

Then, a dedicated time of planning for the shop. This time nurturing the business, my customers, and my collaborators. Every year brings exciting developments for Foxglove, and I need time to nurture those into actions. Such a lovely way to honor what I do and those who support what I do. 

What are you taking time to nurture this winter?

xo Christine

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Winter

The late months of winter in Minnesota tempt with quiet and hibernation, but they also encourage me to delve into projects that I may not take time for in the warmer months. This combination of quiet reflection and concentrated effort is the prefect mix for me. I need down times to renew my energy and still my mind for things to come.

This same mix has been happening at Foxglove in the snow and cold.  I enjoyed having time to pause and reflect after the rush of my first Holiday season here. Finally having a few mornings to linger at home allowed me to compost, dream, and brainstorm for the coming year. I also spent a lot of task driven time catching up on paperwork and making a formal plan and calendar-nurturing both sides of my brain.

Foxglove Market & Studio

Foxglove Market & Studio

Foxglove034.jpg

I just took a physical break from the shop for 3 days-the first I’ve been away that long since I opened….many people assumed I would have a bit of guilt, but I had N.O.N.E. We all need time away to restore our minds and souls, and that is exactly what it did for me. I was in the middle of planning some exciting new offerings at Foxglove, and the break gave me a renewed sense of purpose. Get ready-Foxglove is poised to grow with the seasons this year…a late spring launch, slow flowers expansion in spring, and a summer series of events.

Hope you’re taking some time for yourself and dreaming big.

xo Christine

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Stuff

I often say that stuff inspires me and overwhelms me. Stuff is an essential part of my life and business, and I feel I have a healthy relationship with it. I garner almost as much pleasure from getting rid of it as I do from seeking and collecting it. The thrill of the hunt is indeed a thrill, but the thrill of seeing some thing I have selected fall into the hands of someone who loves it? Even better.

Foxglove Market & Studio

Foxglove Market & Studio

There are times, however, when it feels overwhelming and vaguely hoarder-esque. This is when I begin to question my love for stuff and need to fill spaces with that stuff. Opening this shop was such a natural fit for me, and a logical blending of my past experiences. But, I once again struggled with the stuff part. Consumer-ism and the vast amount of waste in this world can make me a little nutty, and here I was opening another store full of stuff for people to buy.

Therefore, it is a priority to mindfully select items that are made with respect to resources and longevity. My products are carefully curated to bring joy and style into your home while keeping in mind the footprint they create. These are items you will use every day and keep for years and years (I hope).

Live with fewer and better.
Recycle and Reuse.
Enjoy.

Christine

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Cultivating Foxglove

Many people ask me how long I have been planning this shop and developing the idea. Honest answer? Not long at all. I had no intention of opening a shop. In fact, when the idea for opening a store was first presented to me, my immediate reaction was, ” No. Uh Uh. Nope. No thank you.” Then, strangely, it seemed like the perfect thing to do. Sometimes all the stars align, your inner circle of fans say “Yes-you could do this!”, and the universe nudges you in the right direction.

Foxglove Market & Studio

Foxglove Market & Studio

I’m not saying it was an entirely easy decision, or that there aren’t many days I wish I’d had more time to prepare, but I really think this is where I am meant to be right now. I like to say it is my years of design and styling experience parlayed into a retail concept. If your career were a retail store, what would it look like? This is mine, and I’m delighted to share it with you.

Christine

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